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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2010 Nov;16(11):1589-95. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2010.05.014. Epub 2010 May 27.

Single-unit umbilical cord blood transplantation from unrelated donors in adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

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1
Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain. sanz_jai@gva.es

Abstract

Clinical studies focused on outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in need of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and lacking an HLA-matched adult donor are limited. We analyzed the outcome of 26 adults with CML receiving single-unit UCBT from unrelated donors after myeloablative conditioning at a single institution. Conditioning regimens were based on combinations of thiotepa, busulfan, cyclophospamide or fludarabine, and antithymocyte globulin. At the time of transplantation, 7 patients (27%) were in first chronic phase (CP), 11 (42%) were in second CP, 2 (8%) were in accelerated phase (AP), and 6 (23%) were in blast crisis (BC). The cumulative incidence (CI) of myeloid engraftment was 88% at a median time of 22 days and was significantly better for patients receiving higher doses of CD34(+) cells. The CI of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grade II-IV was 61%, that of acute GVHD grade III-IV was 39%, and that of chronic extensive GVHD was 60%. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) was 41% for patients undergoing UCBT while in first or second CP and 100% for patients in AP or BC (P < .01). After a median follow-up of 8 years, none of the patients relapsed, giving an overall disease-free survival (DFS) at 8 years of 41%. The DFS for patients undergoing UCBT while in any CP was 59%. These results demonstrate that UCBT from unrelated donors can be a curative treatment for a substantial number of patients with CML. Advances in supportive care and better selection of cord blood units and patients are needed to improve TRM.

PMID:
20553927
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2010.05.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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