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Respir Res. 2010 Jun 15;11:77. doi: 10.1186/1465-9921-11-77.

Sputum neutrophils as a biomarker in COPD: findings from the ECLIPSE study.

Author information

1
University of Manchester, Medicines Evaluation Unit, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9QZ, UK. dsingh@meu.org.uk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The percentage of neutrophils in sputum are increased in COPD patients, and may therefore be a biomarker of airway inflammation. We studied the relationships between sputum neutrophils and FEV1, health status, exacerbation rates, systemic inflammation and emphysema, and long term variability at 1 year.

METHODS:

Sputum samples were obtained from 488 COPD patients within the ECLIPSE cohort. 359 samples were obtained at baseline, and 297 after 1 year. 168 subjects provided samples at both visits. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, surfactant protein D and C-reactive protein levels were measured by immunoassays. Low-dose CT scans evaluated emphysema.

RESULTS:

Sputum neutrophil % increased with GOLD stage. There was a weak association between % sputum neutrophils and FEV1 % predicted (univariate r2 = 0.025 and 0.094 at baseline and year 1 respectively, p < 0.05 after multivariate regression). Similar weak but significant associations were observed between neutrophil % and health status measured using the St Georges Respiratory Questionairre. There were no associations between neutrophils and exacerbation rates or emphysema. Associations between sputum neutrophils and systemic biomarkers were non-significant or similarly weak. The mean change over 1 year in neutrophil % was an increase of 3.5%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sputum neutrophil measurements in COPD are associated weakly with FEV1 % predicted and health status. Sputum neutrophil measurements were dissociated from exacerbation rates, emphysema and systemic inflammation.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00292552.

PMID:
20550701
PMCID:
PMC2904285
DOI:
10.1186/1465-9921-11-77
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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