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Med Care. 2010 Jul;48(7):645-51. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181dbdc1c.

Medical care utilization for work-related injuries in the United States 2002-2006.

Author information

1
Center for Financing, Access, and Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD 20850, USA. terceira.berdahl@ahrq.hhs.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine racial-ethnic/gender differences in the odds of injury and in the odds of seeking medical treatment among workers in the United States.

METHODS:

Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of having a work injury and the odds of seeking medical treatment for these injuries in a sample of non-Latino Black, Latino, and non-Latino white workers from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2002-2006).

RESULTS:

Significant variation in the odds of injury was observed across racial-ethnic/gender groups. Although race-gender groups had significant variation in the odds of experiencing a work injury, we found few differences in treatment seeking. Among the 6 subgroups, we found that white women were significantly less likely to report an injury and significantly more likely to seek treatment when injured. Having health insurance played a key role in utilization among injured workers. The odds of seeking treatment were 33% lower for uninsured workers compared with those with private insurance. Publicly insured workers were no different from privately insured workers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study sheds light on current trends in work injuries and associated medical care utilization among a nationally representative sample of workers.

PMID:
20548257
DOI:
10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181dbdc1c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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