Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2010 Aug;53(4):917-32. doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0046). Epub 2010 Jun 11.

The language phenotype of children and adolescents with Noonan syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1202 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA. eipierpont@wisc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study presents an analysis of language skills in individuals with Noonan syndrome (NS), an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. We investigated whether the language impairments affecting some individuals arise from deficits specifically within the linguistic system or whether they are associated with cognitive, perceptual, and motor factors. Comparisons of language abilities among the different NS genotypes were also conducted.

METHOD:

Sixty-six children and adolescents with NS were evaluated using standardized speech, language, and literacy assessments. Additional cognitive, perceptual, and motor tasks were administered to examine the relation of these factors to language development. Genotype was noted for those who underwent genetic testing.

RESULTS:

Language impairments were more frequent in NS than in the general population and were associated with higher risk for reading and spelling difficulties. Language was significantly correlated with nonverbal cognition, hearing ability, articulation, motor dexterity, and phonological memory. Genotype analyses suggest that the higher performance of SOS1-positive than PTPN11-positive individuals on language tasks was largely mediated by differences in cognitive ability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that variation in language skill in NS is closely related to cognitive, perceptual, and motor factors. It does not appear that specific aspects of language are selectively affected in this syndrome.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk