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Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(3):541-50. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.04.014. Epub 2010 May 12.

Is neighborhood racial/ethnic composition associated with depressive symptoms? The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, 109 S Observatory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, United States. cmair@prev.org

Abstract

The racial/ethnic composition of a neighborhood may be related to residents' depressive symptoms through differential levels of neighborhood social support and/or stressors. We used the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis to investigate cross-sectional associations of neighborhood racial/ethnic composition with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale in adults aged 45-84. The key exposure was a census-derived measure of the percentage of residents of the same racial/ethnic background in each participant's census tract. Two-level multilevel models were used to estimate associations of neighborhood racial/ethnic composition with CES-D scores after controlling for age, income, marital status, education and nativity. We found that living in a neighborhood with a higher percentage of residents of the same race/ethnicity was associated with increased CES-D scores in African American men (p < 0.05), and decreased CES-D scores in Hispanic men and women and Chinese women, although these differences were not statistically significant. Models were further adjusted for neighborhood-level covariates (social cohesion, safety, problems, aesthetic quality and socioeconomic factors) derived from survey responses and census data. Adjusting for other neighborhood characteristics strengthened protective associations amongst Hispanics, but did not change the significant associations in African American men. These results demonstrate heterogeneity in the associations of race/ethnic composition with mental health and the need for further exploration of which aspects of neighborhood environments may contribute to these associations.

PMID:
20541303
PMCID:
PMC2922985
DOI:
10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.04.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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