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J Clin Neurosci. 2010 Aug;17(8):1025-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2010.04.020. Epub 2010 May 26.

Sodium selenate specifically activates PP2A phosphatase, dephosphorylates tau and reverses memory deficits in an Alzheimer's disease model.

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1
Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Royal Parade, Parkville 3010, Victoria, Australia. niallmcorcoran@gmail.com

Abstract

Neurofibrillary tangles composed of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Tau hyperphosphorylation is thought to promote aggregation with subsequent tangle formation. Reducing tau phosphorylation by boosting the activity of the key phosphatase/s that mediate dephosphorylation of tau could be a viable clinical strategy in AD. One of the key phosphatases implicated in regulating tau protein phosphorylation is the serine-threonine phosphatase PP2A. We have determined that sodium selenate can act as a specific agonist for PP2A, significantly boosting phosphatase activity. Acute treatment of either neuroblastoma cells or normal aged mice with sodium selenate rapidly reduced tau protein phosphorylation. Sodium selenate-treated transgenic TAU441 mice had significantly lower levels of phospho- and total tau levels in the hippocampus and amygdala compared with controls and exhibited significantly improved spatial learning and memory on the Morris Water Maze task. Sodium selenate is a specific activator of PP2A with excellent oral bioavailability, and favourable central nervous system penetrating properties. Clinical studies in patients with AD are envisaged in the near future.

PMID:
20537899
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2010.04.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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