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Stem Cell Res. 2010 Jul;5(1):65-75. doi: 10.1016/j.scr.2010.04.002. Epub 2010 Apr 21.

G-CSF increases mesenchymal precursor cell numbers in the bone marrow via an indirect mechanism involving osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.

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1
Center for Stem Cell Research, Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, 1825 Pressler Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Nathalie.Brouard@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

During the course of studies to investigate whether MPC circulate in response to G-CSF, the agent most frequently used to induce mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors, we observed that while G-CSF failed to increase the number of MPC in circulation (assayed in vitro as fibroblast colony-forming cells, CFU-F), G-CSF administration nevertheless resulted in a time-dependent increase in the absolute number of CFU-F within the BM, peaking at Day 7. Treatment of BM cells from G-CSF-treated mice with hydroxyurea did not alter CFU-F numbers, suggesting that the increase in their numbers in response to G-CSF administration is not due to proliferation of existing CFU-F. Given previous studies demonstrating that G-CSF potently induces bone turnover in mice, we hypothesized that the increase in CFU-F may be triggered by the bone resorption that occurs following G-CSF administration. In accord with this hypothesis, administration of an inhibitor of osteoclast differentiation, osteoprotegerin (OPG), prevented the increase of CFU-F numbers induced by G-CSF. In conclusion, these data indicate that the cytokine treatment routinely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells could provide a readily applicable method to induce in vivo expansion of MPC for clinical applications.

PMID:
20537607
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2010.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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