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J Intellect Disabil Res. 2010 May;54(5):433-47. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2010.01285.x.

Effectiveness of a computerised working memory training in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities.

Author information

1
Utrecht University, Department of General and Special Education, Utrecht, the Netherlands. M.J.vanderMolen@UvA.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special education.

METHOD:

A total of 95 adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities were randomly assigned to either a training adaptive to each child's progress in WM, a non-adaptive WM training, or to a control group.

RESULTS:

Verbal short-term memory (STM) improved significantly from pre- to post-testing in the group who received the adaptive training compared with the control group. The beneficial effect on verbal STM was maintained at follow-up and other effects became clear at that time as well. Both the adaptive and non-adaptive WM training led to higher scores at follow-up than at post-intervention on visual STM, arithmetic and story recall compared with the control condition. In addition, the non-adaptive training group showed a significant increase in visuo-spatial WM capacity.

CONCLUSION:

The current study provides the first demonstration that WM can be effectively trained in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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