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QJM. 2010 Aug;103(8):589-95. doi: 10.1093/qjmed/hcq094. Epub 2010 Jun 9.

Orthostatic symptoms predict functional capacity in chronic fatigue syndrome: implications for management.

Author information

1
NIHR Biomedical Research Centre in Ageing-Cardiovascular Theme, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To establish the relationship between the functional impairment experienced by Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients and the symptoms frequently experienced by those with CFS; specifically cognitive impairment, fatigue and orthostatic symptoms.

DESIGN:

Cross sectional questionnaire survey.

SETTING:

Specialist CFS Clinical Service.

SUBJECTS:

Ninety-nine Fukuda diagnosed CFS and 64-matched controls.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Symptom and functional assessment tools completed and returned by post included; PROMIS HAQ (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, Health Assessment Questionnaire), CFQ (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire), FIS (Fatigue Impact Scale) and OGS (Orthostatic Grading Scale) assessment tools.

RESULTS:

CFS patients experience greater functional impairment than controls [mean (95% CI) PROMIS HAQ scores CFS 36 (31-42) vs. controls 6 (2-10); P < 0.0001], especially in the functional domains of activities and reach. Poorer functional ability impairment is significantly associated with greater cognitive impairment (P = 0.0002, r = 0.4), fatigue (P < 0.0001, r = 0.5) and orthostatic symptoms (P < 0.0001, r = 0.6). However, only orthostatic symptoms (OGS) independently associated with functional impairment (beta = 0.4, P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

Treatment of orthostatic symptoms in CFS has the potential to improve functional capacity and so improve quality of life.

PMID:
20534655
DOI:
10.1093/qjmed/hcq094
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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