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Theor Biol Med Model. 2010 Jun 9;7:19. doi: 10.1186/1742-4682-7-19.

Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Cell Physiology, Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tikhoretsky Ave 4, St, Petersburg 194064, Russia. vladimir.matveev@gmail.com

Abstract

According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity."One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity."Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903).

PMID:
20534114
PMCID:
PMC2901313
DOI:
10.1186/1742-4682-7-19
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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