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Kidney Int. 2010 Aug;78(3):239-45. doi: 10.1038/ki.2010.155. Epub 2010 Jun 9.

The acute, the chronic and the news of HIV-related renal disease in Africa.

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1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. craig.arendse@uct.ac.za

Abstract

The burden of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS patients living in Africa is adversely influenced by inadequate socio-economic and health care infrastructures. Acute kidney injury in HIV-positive patients, mainly as a result of acute tubular necrosis, may arise from a combination of hemodynamic, immunological, and toxic insult. A variety of histopathological forms of chronic kidney disease is also seen in HIV patients; HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) and immune complex disease may require different treatment strategies, which at present are unknown. The role of host and viral genetics is still to be defined, especially in relation to the different viral clades found in various parts of the world and within Africa. The arrival and availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy in Africa has given impetus to research into the outcome of the renal diseases that are found in those with HIV. It has also generated a new look into policies governing dialysis and transplantation in this group where previously there were none.

PMID:
20531456
DOI:
10.1038/ki.2010.155
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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