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J Intern Med. 2010 Aug;268(2):171-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02248.x. Epub 2010 Apr 28.

Vitamin D deficiency and frailty in older Americans.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. ewilhelm@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the relation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and frailty. Frailty is a multidimensional phenotype that describes declining physical function and a vulnerability to adverse outcomes in the setting of physical stress such as illness or hospitalization. Low serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are known to be associated with multiple chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in addition to all cause mortality.

DESIGN:

Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III), we evaluated the association between low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and frailty, defined according to a set of criteria derived from a definition previously described and validated.

SUBJECTS:

Nationally representative survey of noninstitutionalized US residents collected between 1988 and 1994.

RESULTS:

25-Hydroxyvitamin D deficiency, defined as a serum concentration <15 ng mL(-1), was associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of frailty amongst whites and a fourfold increase in the odds of frailty amongst non-whites. This association persisted after sensitivity analyses adjusting for season of the year and latitude of residence, intended to reduce misclassification of persons as 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficient or insufficient.

CONCLUSION:

Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with frailty amongst older adults.

PMID:
20528970
PMCID:
PMC3057108
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02248.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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