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Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2010 Jun;3(6):689-91. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-10-0096.

Long-term follow-up in cancer prevention trials (It ain't over 'til it's over).

Author information

1
Cancer Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics and Statistics, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom. j.cuzick@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

The update of the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene by Vogel et al. (beginning on p. 696 in this issue of the journal) highlights the overall importance of long-term follow-up of cancer prevention trials, which need long follow-up to fully determine agent risks and benefits. Biomarkers (e.g., reduced cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 after human papillomavirus vaccination) can provide an early indication of efficacy but almost never replace the cancer end point in determining the ultimate utility of an agent. Long follow-up is also important to fully determine preventive benefit, as illustrated by the tamoxifen trials, where only 60% as many treated women were needed to prevent one cancer at 10 years as at approximately 5 years, the time of the early reports.

PMID:
20522799
PMCID:
PMC2883740
DOI:
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-10-0096
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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