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Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;92(2):294-303. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28925. Epub 2010 Jun 2.

Dietary patterns associated with fat and bone mass in young children.

Author information

1
Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. wosjek@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity and osteoporosis have origins in childhood, and both are affected by dietary intake and physical activity. However, there is little information on what constitutes a diet that simultaneously promotes low fat mass and high bone mass accrual early in life.

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to identify dietary patterns related to fat and bone mass in children during the age period of 3.8-7.8 y.

DESIGN:

A total of 325 children contributed data from 13 visits over 4 separate study years (age ranges: 3.8-4.8, >4.8-5.8, >5.8-6.8, and >6.8-7.8 y). We performed reduced-rank regression to identify dietary patterns related to fat mass and bone mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for each study year. Covariables included race, sex, height, weight, energy intake, calcium intake, physical activity measured by accelerometry, and time spent viewing television and playing outdoors.

RESULTS:

A dietary pattern characterized by a high intake of dark-green and deep-yellow vegetables was related to low fat mass and high bone mass; high processed-meat intake was related to high bone mass; and high fried-food intake was related to high fat mass. Dietary pattern scores remained related to fat mass and bone mass after all covariables were controlled for (P < 0.001-0.03).

CONCLUSION:

Beginning at preschool age, diets rich in dark-green and deep-yellow vegetables and low in fried foods may lead to healthy fat and bone mass accrual in young children.

PMID:
20519562
PMCID:
PMC2904032
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.2009.28925
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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