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J R Soc Interface. 2010 Aug 6;7 Suppl 4:S483-500. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2010.0114.focus. Epub 2010 Jun 2.

Spray-freeze-drying of nanosuspensions: the manufacture of insulin particles for needle-free ballistic powder delivery.

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1
Department of Engineering Science, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. heiko.schiffter@eng.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

The feasibility of preparing microparticles with high insulin loading suitable for needle-free ballistic drug delivery by spray-freeze-drying (SFD) was examined in this study. The aim was to manufacture dense, robust particles with a diameter of around 50 microm, a narrow size distribution and a high content of insulin. Atomization using ultrasound atomizers showed improved handling of small liquid quantities as well as narrower droplet size distributions over conventional two-fluid nozzle atomization. Insulin nanoparticles were produced by SFD from solutions with a low solid content (<10 mg ml(-1)) and subsequent ultra-turrax homogenization. To prepare particles for needle-free ballistic injection, the insulin nanoparticles were suspended in matrix formulations with a high excipient content (>300 mg ml(-1)) consisting of trehalose, mannitol, dextran (10 kDa) and dextran (150 kDa) (abbreviated to TMDD) in order to maximize particle robustness and density after SFD. With the increase in insulin content, the viscosity of the nanosuspensions increased. Liquid atomization was possible up to a maximum of 250 mg of nano-insulin suspended in a 1.0 g matrix. However, if a narrow size distribution with a good correlation between theoretical and measurable insulin content was desired, no more than 150 mg nano-insulin could be suspended per gram of matrix formulation. Particles were examined by laser light diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tap density testing. Insulin stability was assessed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), reverse phase chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Densification of the particles could be achieved during primary drying if the product temperature (T(prod)) exceeded the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (T(g)') of -29.4 degrees C for TMDD (3331) formulations. Particles showed a collapsed and wrinkled morphology owing to viscous flow of the freeze concentrate. With increasing insulin loading, the d (v, 0.5) of the SFD powders increased and particle size distributions got wider. Insulin showed a good stability during the particle formation process with a maximum decrease in insulin monomer of only 0.123 per cent after SFD. In accordance with the SEC data, FTIR analysis showed only a small increase in the intermolecular beta-sheet of 0.4 per cent after SFD. The good physical stability of the polydisperse particles made them suitable for ballistic injection into tissue-mimicking agar hydrogels, showing a mean penetration depth of 251.3 +/- 114.7 microm.

PMID:
20519207
PMCID:
PMC2943888
DOI:
10.1098/rsif.2010.0114.focus
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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