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Biophys J. 2010 Jun 2;98(11):2601-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2010.02.030.

Kinetics of regulated actin transitions measured by probes on tropomyosin.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.

Erratum in

  • Biophys J. 2012 Mar 7;102(5):1234.

Abstract

Changes in the muscle regulatory protein complex, troponin, are important for modulation of activity and may occur as a result of disease-causing mutations. Both increases and decreases in the rate of ATP hydrolysis by myosin may occur as dictated by changes in the distribution of actin-tropomyosin-troponin among its different states. It is important to measure the rates of transition among these states to study physiological adaptation and disease processes. We show here that acrylodan or pyrene probes on tropomyosin can be used to monitor the transition from active to intermediate and inactive states of actin-tropomyosin-troponin. Transitions measured in the absence of calcium had two phases, as previously reported for some other probes on troponin and actin. The first step was a rapid equilibrium that favored the formation of the intermediate state and had an apparent rate constant less than that of S1-ATP dissociation. The second fluorescence transition was slower, with an apparent constant that increased from approximately 5 to 80/s over a range of 1-37 degrees C. Only the initial rapid transition was seen in the presence of saturating calcium. The acrylodan probe had the advantage of yielding a larger signal than the pyrene probe. Furthermore, the acrylodan signal decreased in going from the active state to the intermediate state, and then increased upon going to the inactive state.

PMID:
20513404
PMCID:
PMC2877322
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpj.2010.02.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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