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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jun;19(6):1557-68. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-1249. Epub 2010 May 26.

Indoor tanning and risk of melanoma: a case-control study in a highly exposed population.

Author information

  • 1Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. lazov001@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Indoor tanning has been only weakly associated with melanoma risk; most reports were unable to adjust for sun exposure, confirm a dose-response, or examine specific tanning devices. A population-based case-control study was conducted to address these limitations.

METHODS:

Cases of invasive cutaneous melanoma, diagnosed in Minnesota between 2004 and 2007 at ages 25 to 59, were ascertained from a statewide cancer registry; age-matched and gender-matched controls were randomly selected from state driver's license lists. Self-administered questionnaires and telephone interviews included information on ever use of indoor tanning, types of device used, initiation age, period of use, dose, duration, and indoor tanning-related burns. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for known melanoma risk factors.

RESULTS:

Among 1,167 cases and 1,101 controls, 62.9% of cases and 51.1% of controls had tanned indoors (adjusted OR 1.74; 95% CI, 1.42-2.14). Melanoma risk was pronounced among users of UVB-enhanced (adjusted OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 2.03-4.03) and primarily UVA-emitting devices (adjusted OR, 4.44; 95% CI, 2.45-8.02). Risk increased with use: years (P < 0.006), hours (P < 0.0001), or sessions (P = 0.0002). ORs were elevated within each initiation age category; among indoor tanners, years used was more relevant for melanoma development.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a highly exposed population, frequent indoor tanning increased melanoma risk, regardless of age when indoor tanning began. Elevated risks were observed across devices.

IMPACT:

This study overcomes some of the limitations of earlier reports and provides strong support for the recent declaration by the IARC that tanning devices are carcinogenic in humans.

PMID:
20507845
PMCID:
PMC2883000
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-1249
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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