Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2010 May 20;5(5):e10732. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0010732.

Do biofilm formation and interactions with human cells explain the clinical success of Acinetobacter baumannii?

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. a.de_breij@lumc.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The dramatic increase in antibiotic resistance and the recent manifestation in war trauma patients underscore the threat of Acinetobacter baumannii as a nosocomial pathogen. Despite numerous reports documenting its epidemicity, little is known about the pathogenicity of A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to obtain insight into the factors that might explain the clinical success of A. baumannii.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We compared biofilm formation, adherence to and inflammatory cytokine induction by human cells for a large panel of well-described strains of A. baumannii and compared these features to that of other, clinically less relevant Acinetobacter species. Results revealed that biofilm formation and adherence to airway epithelial cells varied widely within the various species, but did not differ among the species. However, airway epithelial cells and cultured human macrophages produced significantly less inflammatory cytokines upon exposure to A. baumannii strains than to strains of A. junii, a species infrequently causing infection.

CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE:

The induction of a weak inflammatory response may provide a clue to the persistence of A. baumannii in patients.

PMID:
20505779
PMCID:
PMC2874002
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0010732
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center