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Yonsei Med J. 2010 Jul;51(4):546-51. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2010.51.4.546.

Consolidations in nodular bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease: Mycobacterium avium complex or other infection?

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1
Department of Radiology, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objective of this study is to define the clinical implications of consolidations in nodular bronchiectatic type Mycobacterium avium complex (NBMAC) infection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 69 patients (M : F = 17 : 52; mean age, 64 years; age range, 41-85 years) with MAC isolated in the sputum culture and nodular bronchiectasis on the initial and follow-up CT scans were included. We retrospectively reviewed the incidence of consolidation and analyzed its clinical course by using radiographic changes with or without anti-MAC drug therapy.

RESULTS:

In 44 of the 69 cases (64%), focal consolidations were seen on the initial and follow-up CT images. In 35 of the 44 (80%) cases, consolidations completely regressed, and in 3 cases (7%), consolidations partially regressed within 2 months with only antibiotics. In 2 cases (5%), the consolidations remained stable for over 2 months without anti-MAC drug therapy. Only in 4 cases (9%) did the consolidations improve after anti-MAC drug therapy. In 11 of the 38 cases (29%) with responsiveness to antibiotics, non-mycobacterial micro-organisms were identified in sputum, including pseudomonas, hemophilus, staphylococcus, and others.

CONCLUSION:

In NB-MAC, consolidations are commonly present on CT. In these conditions, most of consolidations result from pneumonia other than MAC.

PMID:
20499420
PMCID:
PMC2880267
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2010.51.4.546
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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