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Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2010 Jul;30(4):241-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-097X.2010.00934.x. Epub 2010 May 11.

Perfusion heterogeneity does not explain excess muscle oxygen uptake during variable intensity exercise.

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1
Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden. marko.laaksonen@miun.se

Abstract

The association between muscle oxygen uptake (VO(2)) and perfusion or perfusion heterogeneity (relative dispersion, RD) was studied in eight healthy male subjects during intermittent isometric (1 s on, 2 s off) one-legged knee-extension exercise at variable intensities using positron emission tomography and a-v blood sampling. Resistance during the first 6 min of exercise was 50% of maximal isometric voluntary contraction force (MVC) (HI-1), followed by 6 min at 10% MVC (LOW) and finishing with 6 min at 50% MVC (HI-2). Muscle perfusion and O(2) delivery during HI-1 (26 +/- 5 and 5.4 +/- 1.0 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1)) and HI-2 (28 +/- 4 and 5.8 +/- 0.7 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1)) were similar, but both were higher (P<0.01) than during LOW (15 +/- 3 and 3.0 +/- 0.6 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1)). Muscle VO(2) was also higher during both HI workloads (HI-1 3.3 +/- 0.4 and HI-2 4.1 +/- 0.6 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1)) than LOW (1.4 +/- 0.4 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1); P<0.01) and 25% higher during HI-2 than HI-1 (P<0.05). O(2) extraction was higher during HI workloads (HI-1 62 +/- 7 and HI-2 70 +/- 7%) than LOW (45 +/- 8%; P<0.01). O(2) extraction tended to be higher (P = 0.08) during HI-2 when compared to HI-1. Perfusion was less heterogeneous (P<0.05) during HI workloads when compared to LOW with no difference between HI workloads. Thus, during one-legged knee-extension exercise at variable intensities, skeletal muscle perfusion and O(2) delivery are unchanged between high-intensity workloads, whereas muscle VO(2) is increased during the second high-intensity workload. Perfusion heterogeneity cannot explain this discrepancy between O(2) delivery and uptake. We propose that the excess muscle VO(2) during the second high-intensity workload is derived from working muscle cells.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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