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Indian J Pharm Sci. 2009 May;71(3):270-5. doi: 10.4103/0250-474X.56025.

Effect of folic Acid on hematological changes in methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi-110 062, India.

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate the effect of folic acid on homocysteine, lipid profile and hematological changes in methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Hyperhomocysteinemia was induced by methionine (1 g/kg, p.o.) administration for 30 days. Biochemical and hematological observations were further substantiated with histopathological examination. The increase in homocysteine, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides levels with reduction in the levels of high density lipoprotein in serum were the salient features observed in methionine treated toxicologic control rats (i.e. group II). Hematological observations of the peripheral blood smears of toxicologic rats also showed crenation of red blood cells membrane and significant (P<0.01) increase in total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count and platelet counts with significant (P<0.01) decrease in the mean hemoglobin levels, as compared to vehicle control rats. Administration of folic acid (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for 30 days to methionine- induced hyperhomocysteinemic rats produced a significant (P< 0.01) decrease in the levels of homocysteine, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides with significant (P< 0.01) increase in high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in serum when compared with toxicologic control rats. The present study, for the first time, investigates the effect of folic acid treatment on hematological changes in rats with methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia.

KEYWORDS:

Folic acid; hematological changes; homocysteine; methionine; oxidative stress

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