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Psychosomatics. 2010 May-Jun;51(3):230-6. doi: 10.1176/appi.psy.51.3.230.

Pain after heart transplantation: prevalence and implications for quality of life.

Author information

1
Dept. of Psychology, University of British Columbia-Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC, Canada V1V 1V7. susan.holtzman@ubc.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Because of increasing survival rates among transplant recipients, there is now growing attention on evaluating and enhancing patient quality of life (QOL) during these extended years of survival.

OBJECTIVE:

The authors investigated the prevalence of pain among heart-transplant recipients, and the extent to which pain may affect QOL posttransplant.

METHOD:

Ninety-two heart recipients completed a questionnaire, including measures of QOL and demographics.

RESULTS:

Almost half of all patients (46%) reported at least mild pain, and 21% reported moderate to very severe pain. Across all Health Survey (SF-36) domains, patients with at least mild pain reported worse QOL than the general population. Those with no or very mild pain reported social functioning and mental health comparable to population norms. Patients with at least mild pain were also less likely to be employed.

CONCLUSION:

Given the effects of pain on QOL in transplant patients, increased attention toward more effective clinical assessment and treatment of pain is warranted.

PMID:
20484721
DOI:
10.1176/appi.psy.51.3.230
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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