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Clin Neurophysiol. 2010 Nov;121(11):1871-7. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2010.04.022. Epub 2010 May 18.

Resting-state EEG gamma activity in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Author information

1
Brain & Behaviour Research Institute and School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522, Australia. Robert_Barry@uow.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) have well-described abnormalities in the four traditional EEG bands. However, to date the gamma band has not been widely investigated. This study investigated resting-state EEG in children with AD/HD and matched controls, with a particular focus on gamma activity.

METHOD:

Forty children with AD/HD, and 40 age- and sex-matched controls, participated. EEG was recorded from 19 sites during an eyes-closed resting condition and Fourier transformed to provide estimates for absolute and relative power in the delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands.

RESULTS:

Children with AD/HD had elevated levels of absolute delta and theta power, and decreased levels of absolute beta and gamma power, compared to controls. With relative power measures, children with AD/HD showed enhanced delta and theta activity, with reduced alpha, beta and gamma activity. Inattention scores on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale were negatively correlated with absolute gamma.

CONCLUSIONS:

These patients demonstrate the typical EEG profile in the eyes-closed resting state, over the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands, associated with AD/HD. In addition, compared with controls, they demonstrate reduced absolute and relative gamma activity. These differences appear to contribute importantly to their dysfunctional stimulus processing, and impact their behavioural outcomes.

SIGNIFICANCE:

This resting-state study extends the well-established fast-wave EEG deficits in children with AD/HD to the gamma band, and links that to increased inattention, which is of special importance in understanding their cognitive-processing problems.

PMID:
20483659
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2010.04.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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