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Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2010 Jul;26(4):310-7. doi: 10.1097/MOG.0b013e328339d099.

Proinflammatory cytokines underlying the inflammation of Crohn's disease.

Author information

1
Mucosal Immunity Section, Laboratory of Host Defenses, NIAID, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-6612, USA. Wstrober@niaid.nih.gov

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To encapsulate our current understanding of the proinflammatory cytokines responsible for the inflammation underlying Crohn's disease and the prospect of using this information to devise therapy for this condition based on inhibition of these cytokines.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Current research is shedding new light on the role of both T helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 responses in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Initial studies conducted a decade ago highlighted the view that Crohn's disease inflammation is caused by an interleukin-12-driven Th1 response, which resulted in the generation of interferon-gamma, which then served as the main inflammatory mediator. In recent years, however, this view has been largely eclipsed by studies, conducted mainly in murine models, showing that a Th17 response is the main cause of Crohn's disease inflammation through the production of interleukin-17. Now, a somewhat more balanced view is emerging, which holds that interferon-gamma is still a major proinflammatory cytokine in Crohn's disease, although it may arise from both the Th1 and Th17-mediated responses at different phases of the inflammatory process.

SUMMARY:

The new findings continue to support the idea that anti-interleukin-12p40, an antibody that inhibits both the Th1 and Th17 response, is logically the most potent anticytokine for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

PMID:
20473158
PMCID:
PMC3681421
DOI:
10.1097/MOG.0b013e328339d099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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