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Br J Ophthalmol. 2010 Nov;94(11):1506-8. doi: 10.1136/bjo.2009.159913. Epub 2010 May 14.

Fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography concordance for choroidal neovascularisation in multifocal choroidtis.

Author information

1
LuEsther T. Mertz Retinal Research Center/Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital and Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the utility of fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) as diagnostic adjuncts in evaluating symptomatic patients with choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) due to multifocal choroiditis (MFC).

METHODS:

Patients with CNV due to MFC were retrospectively evaluated in a consecutive fashion. Fundus photography, FA, OCT and biomicroscopy were used to establish the diagnosis. Primary outcome measures included CNV classification (type 1 or occult and type 2 or classic) location and the associated FA and OCT findings.

RESULTS:

Twenty eyes from 17 patients were included in the study. In 19 eyes (95%) the FA revealed CNV type 2; in one eye (5%) the type of CNV was indeterminate due to a subretinal haemorrhage that covered the lesion. Thirteen eyes had OCT imaging and all revealed hyper-reflectance beneath the neurosensory retina. However, only 53.8% revealed subretinal fluid (SRF) or intraretinal cystic abnormalities.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CNV in MFC is virtually always type 2, or so-called classic CNV, with vessels beneath the neurosensory retina. Except when blocked by subretinal blood, the neovascularisation is clearly demonstrated by FA. In contrast, only 53.8% of these eyes showed clear evidence of actively proliferating neovascularisation on OCT. Therefore, eyes suspected of having CNV in MFC should be evaluated with FA.

PMID:
20472744
DOI:
10.1136/bjo.2009.159913
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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