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Fertil Steril. 2010 Oct;94(5):1565-74. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.03.081. Epub 2010 May 14.

Insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, and depression in polycystic ovary syndrome: biobehavioral mechanisms and interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124, USA. k.farrell1@umiami.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To summarize physiological and psychological characteristics that are common among women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and provide evidence suggesting that addressing psychological disturbances can reduce or alleviate physical symptoms of PCOS through behavioral pathways and physiological pathways.

METHOD(S):

Empirical studies and expert consensuses pertaining to physiological, psychological, and medical management aspects of PCOS were identified and presented in this review. Articles were identified by searching Pubmed, PsycInfo, Medline ISI, CINAHL, or a Web browser (i.e., Google) using numerous combinations of terms pertaining to physiological, psychological, and medical management aspects of PCOS. An article was chosen to be included in this review if it reported findings and/or provided information that related to and helped support the main purpose(s) of this review article.

RESULT(S):

Available literature on the physiological (i.e., hyperandrogenism, central obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance) and psychological (i.e., depression, anxiety, eating disorders) factors among women with PCOS provides evidence that these various aspects of PCOS are strongly interrelated.

CONCLUSION(S):

The existence of these relationships among physiological and psychological factors strongly suggests that medical management of PCOS would greatly benefit from inclusion of psychological and behavioral approaches.

PMID:
20471009
PMCID:
PMC2941530
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.03.081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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