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Surgery. 2010 Aug;148(2):263-70. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2010.03.019. Epub 2010 May 13.

A novel mechanism for neutrophil priming in trauma: potential role of peritoneal fluid.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to determine the effect of peritoneal fluid from a novel animal model of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) on the proinflammatory status of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes. We hypothesize that peritoneal fluid is a potential priming and/or activating agent for PMNs/monocytes.

METHODS:

ACS was induced in female Yorkshire swine, and peritoneal fluid was collected at the time of decompressive laparotomy. Naïve PMNs/monocytes were primed and/or activated with peritoneal fluid, phosphatidylcholine (PAF) plus peritoneal fluid, peritoneal fluid plus n-formyl-met-leu-phe (fMLP), and peritoneal fluid plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Activation was determined by surface marker expression of integrins (CD11b an CD18) and selectins (CD62L). Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines in peritoneal fluid were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Peritoneal fluid did not activate PMNs but increased CD11b expression on monocytes. When used as a primer for fMLP- or PMA-induced activation, peritoneal fluid significantly increased CD11b and CD18 expression on PMNs and monocytes. Peritoneal fluid collected at 6 and 12 h post decompressive laparotomy had similar effects. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels were increased in peritoneal fluid.

CONCLUSION:

Peritoneal fluid represents a primer for PMNs/monocytes and seems to act through receptor-dependent and receptor-independent pathways. Strategies to reduce the amount of peritoneal fluid may decrease the locoregional and systemic inflammatory response by reducing priming and activation of neutrophils/monocytes.

PMID:
20466401
PMCID:
PMC2905488
DOI:
10.1016/j.surg.2010.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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