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Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Jun 1;77(2):582-90. doi: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.12.043.

Loss of matrix metalloproteinase-13 attenuates murine radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Pathology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome.

RESULTS:

We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

PMID:
20457355
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.12.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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