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Aging Ment Health. 2010 May;14(4):425-32. doi: 10.1080/13607860903483102.

Perceived reciprocity in social exchange and health functioning in early old age: prospective findings from the GAZEL study.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sociology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany. wahrendorf@uni-duesseldorf.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess prospectively the effects of perceived non-reciprocity of exchange in three different types of social engagement on health functioning in early old age.

METHODS:

In the frame of the prospective French GAZEL cohort study, data on reciprocity in three types of role-related social engagement (principal regular activity in everyday life, marital role relationship, trusting relationships in civic life) were collected from 8679 men and 2742 women (mean age: 60.4 years) in 2005. Two years later, health functioning was assessed using the SF-36 mental and physical component scores, as well as self-perceived health. Multivariate regressions were calculated, controlling for important confounders including baseline self-perceived health.

RESULTS:

Consistent effects of perceived non-reciprocity in all three types of social exchange on mental and physical health functioning were observed. After adjustment for relevant confounders including baseline self-perceived, health effects were attenuated, but largely remained significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings underline the importance of the quality of social exchange (reciprocity vs. non-reciprocity) for health functioning in early old age.

PMID:
20455118
PMCID:
PMC3112175
DOI:
10.1080/13607860903483102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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