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J Hypertens. 2010 Sep;28(9):1814-20. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e32833a3911.

Association of environmental tobacco smoke exposure with elevated home blood pressure in Japanese women: the Ohasama study.

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1
Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Only a few of numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a positive association between environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and blood pressure (BP), despite experimental studies showing such a positive association. The association between home blood pressure (HBP) and ETS exposure was investigated in the general population.

METHODS:

Five hundred and seventy-nine nonsmoking Japanese women were enrolled. The participants were classified into four categories according to their responses to a self-administered questionnaire: unexposed women (non-ETS), women exposed at home [ETS(home)], at the workplace/other places [ETS(work/other)] and at home and at the workplace/other places [ETS(both)]. Variables were compared using analysis of covariance adjusted for age, marital status, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, stroke, heart disease, hyperlipidemia, alcohol intake, salt intake and activity levels.

RESULTS:

In participants without antihypertensive medication, systolic morning HBP in ETS(both) was 4 mmHg higher than that in non-ETS (116.8 +/- 1.01 vs. 113.1 +/- 1.08 mmHg, P = 0.02) and systolic morning HBP in ETS(home) and systolic evening HBP in ETS(both) were 3 mmHg higher than those in non-ETS (116.2 +/- 1.07 vs. 113.1 +/- 1.08 mmHg, P = 0.04; and 115.3 +/- 1.02 vs. 111.9 +/- 1.09 mmHg, P = 0.03, respectively). In participants with antihypertensive medication, ETS exposure status was not significantly associated with increased HBP levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

A positive association between HBP levels and ETS exposure was confirmed. HBP measurement is recommended in population-based studies investigating the effects of ETS exposure. ETS exposure may increase BP, thereby synergistically contributing to unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes along with other deleterious effects of ETS.

Comment in

PMID:
20453668
DOI:
10.1097/HJH.0b013e32833a3911
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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