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J Athl Train. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):253-8. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-45.3.253.

Association of generalized joint hypermobility with a history of glenohumeral joint instability.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Physical Therapy, Keller Army Hospital, West Point, NY 10996, USA. kenneth.cameron@amedd.army.mil

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Little is known about the relationship among sex, generalized joint hypermobility, and glenohumeral joint instability.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship among sex, generalized joint hypermobility scores, and a history of glenohumeral joint instability within a young, physically active cohort and to describe the incidence of generalized joint hypermobility within this population.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional cohort study.

SETTING:

United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Of the 1311 members of the entering freshman class of 2010, 1050 (80%) agreed to participate.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Generalized joint hypermobility was assessed using the Beighton Scale. A history of glenohumeral joint instability was identified via a baseline questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Most participants (78%) had no signs of generalized joint hypermobility. Only 11 volunteers (1.5%) had Beighton Scale scores of 4 or greater. Logistic regression analysis revealed a relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a history of glenohumeral joint instability (P = .023). When sex and race were controlled, those with a total Beighton Scale score of >or=2 were nearly 2.5 times as likely (odds ratio = 2.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.19, 5.20, P = .016) to have reported a history of glenohumeral joint instability. A relationship was observed between sex and nearly all individual Beighton Scale items. Although women had higher total Beighton Scale scores than men, sex (P = .658) and race (P = .410) were not related to a history of glenohumeral joint instability when other variables in the model were controlled.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these participants, generalized joint hypermobility and a history of glenohumeral joint instability were associated.

PMID:
20446838
PMCID:
PMC2865963
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-45.3.253
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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