Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuroimage. 2010 Oct 1;52(4):1215-23. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.258. Epub 2010 May 2.

Longitudinal changes in cortical thickness associated with normal aging.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Personality and Cognition, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD 21224-2816, USA. thambisettym@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Imaging studies of anatomic changes in regional gray matter volumes and cortical thickness have documented age effects in many brain regions, but the majority of such studies have been cross-sectional investigations of individuals studied at a single point in time. In this study, using serial imaging assessments of participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), we investigate longitudinal changes in cortical thickness during aging in a cohort of 66 older adults (mean age 68.78; sd. 6.6; range 60-84 at baseline) without dementia. We used the Cortical Reconstruction Using Implicit Surface Evolution CRUISE suite of algorithms to automatically generate a reconstruction of the cortical surface and identified twenty gyral based regions of interest per hemisphere. Using mixed effects regression, we investigated longitudinal changes in these regions over a mean follow-up interval of 8 years. The main finding in this study is that age-related decline in cortical thickness is widespread, but shows an anterior-posterior gradient with frontal and parietal regions, in general, exhibiting greater rates of decline than temporal and occipital. There were fewer regions in the right hemisphere showing statistically significant age-associated longitudinal decreases in mean cortical thickness. Males showed greater rates of decline in the middle frontal, inferior parietal, parahippocampal, postcentral, and superior temporal gyri in the left hemisphere, right precuneus and bilaterally in the superior parietal and cingulate regions. Significant nonlinear changes over time were observed in the postcentral, precentral, and orbitofrontal gyri on the left and inferior parietal, cingulate, and orbitofrontal gyri on the right.

PMID:
20441796
PMCID:
PMC2910226
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.258
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center