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Cleve Clin J Med. 2010 May;77(5):327-34. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.77a.09121.

Laryngopharyngeal reflux: More questions than answers.

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1
Division of Medicine, Vanderbilt, University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-5280, USA.

Abstract

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), an extraesophageal variant of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is associated with hoarseness, chronic cough, throat-clearing, sore throat, and dysphagia. But because these symptoms are nonspecific, laryngoscopy is often done and the diagnosis of LPR is considered if edema, erythema, ventricular obliteration, pseudosulcus, or postcricoid hyperplasia is noted. Most patients with suspected LPR are given a 2-month trial of a proton pump inhibitor. Yet there is still little or no solid evidence on which to base the diagnosis or the treatment of LPR. We review the current understanding of the pathophysiology and discuss current diagnostic tests and treatment regimens in patients with suspected LPR.

PMID:
20439565
DOI:
10.3949/ccjm.77a.09121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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