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J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2011 Mar-Apr;48(2):92-7. doi: 10.3928/01913913-20100420-02. Epub 2010 Apr 22.

Decreased contrast sensitivity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Patras School of Medicine, Patras, Greece. cgeorg@otenet.gr

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate contrast sensitivity in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus without evidence of diabetic retinopathy.

METHODS:

Sixty patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (age range: 8 to 18 years) were studied. Their contrast sensitivity scores were obtained using the CSV-1000 device (Vector Vision, Dayton, OH) for four spatial frequencies and were compared with v scores of 45 age-matched and gender-matched "healthy" patients. Contrast sensitivity values were also correlated to patient's age, duration of disease, and metabolic control of diabetes mellitus.

RESULTS:

The patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus had a significant contrast sensitivity score reduction at all spatial frequencies tested. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were inversely related to the contrast sensitivity thresholds. No significant correlation was found between the contrast sensitivity scores and the patient's age or duration of disease.

CONCLUSION:

Contrast sensitivity defects are detected in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These defects may represent an early dysfunction of the retina, visual pathway, or both in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who do not show any signs of diabetic retinopathy.

PMID:
20438040
DOI:
10.3928/01913913-20100420-02
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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