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Chest. 2010 Oct;138(4):944-9. doi: 10.1378/chest.10-0099. Epub 2010 Apr 30.

Trends and burden of bronchiectasis-associated hospitalizations in the United States, 1993-2006.

Author information

1
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current data on bronchiectasis prevalence, trends, and risk factors are lacking; such data are needed to estimate the burden of disease and for improved medical care and public health resource allocation. The objective of the present study was to estimate the trends and burden of bronchiectasis-associated hospitalizations in the United States.

METHODS:

We extracted hospital discharge records containing International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes for bronchiectasis (494, 494.0, and 494.1) as any discharge diagnosis from the State Inpatient Databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Discharge records were extracted for 12 states with complete and continuous reporting from 1993 to 2006.

RESULTS:

The average annual age-adjusted hospitalization rate from 1993 to 2006 was 16.5 hospitalizations per 100,000 population. From 1993 to 2006, the age-adjusted rate increased significantly, with an average annual percentage increase of 2.4% among men and 3.0% among women. Women and persons aged > 60 years had the highest rate of bronchiectasis-associated hospitalizations. The median cost for inpatient care was 7,827 US dollars (USD) (range, 13-543,914 USD).

CONCLUSIONS:

The average annual age-adjusted rate of bronchiectasis-associated hospitalizations increased from 1993 to 2006. This study furthers the understanding of the impact of bronchiectasis and demonstrates the need for further research to identify risk factors and reasons for the increasing burden.

PMID:
20435655
PMCID:
PMC2951757
DOI:
10.1378/chest.10-0099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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