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Schizophr Res. 2010 Jul;120(1-3):108-12. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2010.03.026.

Consanguinity and increased risk for schizophrenia in Egypt.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Consanguinity has been suggested as a risk factor for psychoses in some Middle Eastern countries, but adequate control data are unavailable. Our recent studies in Egypt have shown elevated parental consanguinity rates among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1), compared with controls. We have now extended our analyses to schizophrenia (SZ) in the same population.

METHODS:

A case-control study was conducted at Mansoura University Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt (SZ, n=75; controls, n=126, and their available parents). The prevalence of consanguinity was estimated from family history data ('self report'), followed by DNA analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs, n=63) ('DNA-based' rates).

RESULTS:

Self-reported consanguinity was significantly elevated among the patients (SZ: 46.6%, controls: 19.8%, OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.88, 6.64; p=0.000058, 1 d.f.). These differences were confirmed using DNA-based estimates for coefficients of inbreeding (inbreeding coefficients as means+/-standard error, cases: 0.058+/-0.007, controls: 0.022+/-0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

Consanguinity rates are significantly elevated among Egyptian SZ patients in the Nile delta region. The associations are similar to those observed with BP1 in our earlier study. If replicated, the substantial risk associated with consanguinity raises public health concerns. They may also pave the way for gene mapping studies.

PMID:
20435442
PMCID:
PMC2900407
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2010.03.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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