Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chemosphere. 2010 Jun;80(3):279-85. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2010.04.021.

Characterization of substances released from crumb rubber material used on artificial turf fields.

Author information

1
The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.

Erratum in

  • Chemosphere. 2010 Sep;80(11):1406-7.

Abstract

Crumb rubber material (CRM) used as infill on artificial turf fields can be the source of a variety of substances released to the environment and to living organisms in the vicinity of the CRM. To assess potential risks of major volatilized and leached substances derived from CRM, methods were developed to identify organic compounds and elements, either in the vapor phase and/or the leachate from CRM. A qualitative method based on solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to identify the major volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out-gassing from CRM samples under defined laboratory conditions. Direct vapor phase injection into the GC-MS was applied for the quantitative analysis. Ten organic compounds were identified in the vapor phase by the SPME method. Volatile benzothiazole (BT) was detected at the highest level in all commercial CRM samples, in the range 8.2-69 ng g(-1) CRM. Other volatile PAHs and antioxidants were quantified in the vapor phase as well. A decrease of volatile compounds was noted in the headspace over CRM samples from 2-years-old fields when compared with the virgin CRM used at installation. An outdoor experiment under natural weathering conditions showed a significant reduction of out-gassing organic compounds from the CRM in the first 14 d; thereafter, values remained consistent up to 70 d of observation. Zinc was the most abundant element in the acidified leachate (220-13000 microg g(-1)), while leachable BT was detected at relatively low amounts.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center