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Int J Sports Med. 2010 Jul;31(7):511-5. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1243616. Epub 2010 Apr 29.

Bone status in professional cyclists.

Author information

1
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences and Orthopaedic Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. fcampion@vo2max.org

Abstract

Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; VO (2)max: 70.5 (5.5) ml.kg (-1).min (-1)) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p=0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g.cm (-2); p<0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p=0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p<0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g.cm (-2); p<0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p<0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P<0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p<0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (-18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity.

PMID:
20432201
DOI:
10.1055/s-0029-1243616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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