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J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2010 Jul;65(4):425-33. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq031. Epub 2010 Apr 28.

Psychosocial resources and associations between childhood physical abuse and adult well-being.

Author information

1
Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA. lindsay.m.pitzer.1@nd.edu

Abstract

Childhood physical abuse is often associated with detrimental physical and psychological consequences in adulthood. Yet, some adults appear to overcome effects of very severe parental physical abuse in childhood. This study considered whether psychosocial resources (i.e., emotional and instrumental support, personal control) explain variability in well-being for adults who experienced childhood physical abuse by their parents. Participants included 2,711 adults aged 25-74 years from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS I) study. Moderation models revealed that high levels of personal control were associated with better physical and psychological functioning among adults who were physically abused as children. Thus, personal control may be a key factor to health and well-being and thus resilient functioning following childhood abuse.

PMID:
20427461
PMCID:
PMC2883870
DOI:
10.1093/geronb/gbq031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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