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J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2011 Mar;64(3):329-34. doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2010.03.052. Epub 2010 Apr 28.

Autogenous bone graft for expansion thoracoplasty in Adam Robert Wright syndrome: a case report and review.

Author information

1
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

We present a direct anterior sternal split expansion as a surgical option for a case of severe Thoracic Insufficiency Syndrome (TIS) in an arthrogryposis-like patient. This patient's clinical features were published as a newly described syndrome: Adam Robert Wright Syndrome. The patient born with this syndrome displays characteristic craniofacial abnormalities, severe thoracic insufficiency syndrome, cleft palate, limb contractures, arthrogryposis, pulmonary hypoplasia, cryptorchidism, ophthalmoplegia and retinopathy, with normal intelligence. His severe thoracic insufficiency necessitated an urgent life-saving surgical intervention for a progressively worsening sleep apnoea and respiratory distress. We present a review of published data of sternal expansion thoracoplasty from 1965 to 2007 found in the literature. We demonstrate that direct anterior sternal split thoracoplasty with autogenous rib grafts is an effective technique for the acute management of thoracic insufficiency syndrome in this specific case. This procedure provided our patient with symptomatic benefit. To our knowledge, this is the only reported surgical management of thoracic insufficiency syndrome demonstrating a statistical improvement in chest wall compliance and tidal volume. We show that direct anterior sternal split expansion is a surgical treatment option in some patients with thoracic insufficiency syndrome. Our surgical strategy for the management of severe thoracic insufficiency syndrome in Adam Robert Wright Syndrome provided symptomatic relief and favourable long-term results.

PMID:
20427250
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjps.2010.03.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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