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Br J Cancer. 2010 Apr 27;102(9):1384-90. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605654.

Quantitative expression analysis and prognostic significance of L-DOPA decarboxylase in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Athens, Athens GR-15701, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

L-DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is an enzyme that catalyses, mainly, the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine and was found to be involved in many malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression levels of the DDC gene and to evaluate its clinical utility in tissues with colorectal adenocarcinoma.

METHODS:

Total RNA was isolated from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues of 95 patients. After having tested RNA quality, we prepared cDNA by reverse transcription. Highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method for DDC mRNA quantification was developed using the SYBR Green chemistry. GAPDH served as a housekeeping gene. Relative quantification analysis was performed using the comparative C(T) method (2(-DeltaDeltaC(T))).

RESULTS:

DDC mRNA expression varied remarkably among colorectal tumours examined in this study. High DDC mRNA expression levels were found in well-differentiated and Dukes' stage A and B tumours. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that patients with DDC-positive tumours have significantly longer disease-free survival (P=0.009) and overall survival (P=0.027). In Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort of patients, negative DDC proved to be a significant predictor of reduced disease-free (P=0.021) and overall survival (P=0.047).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the study suggest that DDC mRNA expression may be regarded as a novel potential tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

PMID:
20424616
PMCID:
PMC2865762
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605654
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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