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Wound Repair Regen. 2010 Mar-Apr;18(2):168-79.

New dressing materials derived from transgenic flax products to treat long-standing venous ulcers--a pilot study.

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1
Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.

Abstract

A new flax dressing product was developed based on three components (fibers, oil emulsion, and seedcake extract) from genetically engineered flax plants that were obtained by plant transformation using three genes controlling the synthesis of antioxidative compounds from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Simultaneous flax explant transformation with three genes coding for chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and dihydroflavonol reductase resulted in an accumulation of phenolic acids in the fibers, polyunsaturated fatty acids in the oil, and lignans in the seedcake. The fibers, oil, and seedcake from transgenic flax contained a broad spectrum of antioxidative compounds. They were tested for cytotoxicity, and none were found to have a negative effect on the growth and morphology of Balb/3T3 cells. In this preliminary report, we present pilot data on the effects of using linen dressing treatment on its own or in combination with oil emulsion and/or seedcake extract on chronic wound healing. After a 12-week study, we concluded that an application of a modified flax-dressing (linen) bandage might yield a more rapid rate of healing and reduce the wound exudes and wound size. In several cases, wound healing was completed during the period of investigation. Interestingly and importantly, the patients reported that the new bandage made from modified flax diminished the pain accompanying chronic venous ulceration. Further study is required to determine any definitive effects of flax bandage on wound healing. This is the first pilot study report suggesting the benefits of a flax-based dressing on wound healing.

PMID:
20419874
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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