Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Crisis. 2010;31(2):109-12. doi: 10.1027/0227-5910/a000017.

A pilot study of mobile telephone message interventions with suicide attempters in China.

Author information

1
Centre for Research and Intervention on Suicide and Euthanasia, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In China, where follow-up with hospitalized attempters is generally lacking, there is a great need for inexpensive and effective means of maintaining contact and decreasing recidivism.

AIMS:

Our objective was to test whether mobile telephone message contacts after discharge would be feasible and acceptable to suicide attempters in China.

METHODS:

Fifteen participants were recruited from suicide attempters seen in the Emergency Department in Wuhan, China, to participate in a pilot study to receive mobile telephone messages after discharge. All participants have access to a mobile telephone, and there is no charge for the user to receive text messages.

RESULTS:

Most participants (12) considered the text message contacts an acceptable and useful form of help and would like to continue to receive them for a longer period of time.

CONCLUSIONS:

This suggests that, as a low-cost and quick method of intervention in areas where more intensive follow-up is not practical or available, telephone messages contacts are accessible, feasible, and acceptable to suicide attempters. We hope that this will inspire future research on regular and long-term message interventions to prevent recidivism in suicide attempters.

PMID:
20418217
DOI:
10.1027/0227-5910/a000017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center