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Phys Life Rev. 2010 Jun;7(2):195-249. doi: 10.1016/j.plrev.2010.04.001. Epub 2010 Apr 13.

Natural world physical, brain operational, and mind phenomenal space-time.

Author information

1
BM-Science - Brain and Mind Technologies Research Centre, Espoo, Finland. andrew.fingelkurts@bm-science.com

Abstract

Concepts of space and time are widely developed in physics. However, there is a considerable lack of biologically plausible theoretical frameworks that can demonstrate how space and time dimensions are implemented in the activity of the most complex life-system - the brain with a mind. Brain activity is organized both temporally and spatially, thus representing space-time in the brain. Critical analysis of recent research on the space-time organization of the brain's activity pointed to the existence of so-called operational space-time in the brain. This space-time is limited to the execution of brain operations of differing complexity. During each such brain operation a particular short-term spatio-temporal pattern of integrated activity of different brain areas emerges within related operational space-time. At the same time, to have a fully functional human brain one needs to have a subjective mental experience. Current research on the subjective mental experience offers detailed analysis of space-time organization of the mind. According to this research, subjective mental experience (subjective virtual world) has definitive spatial and temporal properties similar to many physical phenomena. Based on systematic review of the propositions and tenets of brain and mind space-time descriptions, our aim in this review essay is to explore the relations between the two. To be precise, we would like to discuss the hypothesis that via the brain operational space-time the mind subjective space-time is connected to otherwise distant physical space-time reality.

PMID:
20417160
DOI:
10.1016/j.plrev.2010.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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