Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Hum Biol. 2010 Jun;37(3):403-26. doi: 10.3109/03014461003712947.

Early human peopling of Sicily: Evidence from the Mesolithic skeletal remains from Grotta d'Oriente.

Author information

1
Laboratorio di Archeoantropologia, Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana, Florence, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The site of Grotta d'Oriente, Island of Favignana, Sicily has yielded the complete skeleton of an adult female (OB) dated to the Mesolithic age. The cranial morphometry of this individual can provide us with some useful information about the peopling of Sicily in the Early Holocene period.

AIM:

Morphological affinities of OB and other Sicilian Mesolithic specimens were assessed to verify hypotheses concerning the early peopling of Sicily.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Craniofacial metric data were employed in a comparative analysis with European Upper Palaeolithic (UP), Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Copper/Bronze age samples, and contemporary Italians. Both a model-free and a model-bound approach were used not only to calculate craniometric distances, but also to assess the role played by gene flow and drift to produce the resulting pattern of variations and relationships.

RESULTS:

A Sicilian Mesolithic (SM) sample, including OB, resulted morphologically very close to an Italian Late UP comparative group. A general similarity among Western/Central European UP and Mesolithic groups was also detected.

CONCLUSION:

Intense gene flow among hunter-gatherer populations accounts for close resemblances among various UP and Mesolithic groups. The beginning of a regional characterization is suggested by the morphological similarity between Italian Late UP and SM, and by decreasing gene flow among populations during the transition from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Mesolithic period.

PMID:
20412025
DOI:
10.3109/03014461003712947
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis
    Loading ...
    Support Center