Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Med Cardiol. 2009 May 27;3:53-60.

Circulating CD34+ Cell Count is Associated with Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Asymptomatic Amish Men, Independent of 10-Year Framingham Risk.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bone-marrow derived progenitor cells (PCs) may play a role in maintaining vascular health by actively repairing damaged endothelium. The purpose of this study in asymptomatic Old Order Amish men (n = 90) without hypertension or diabetes was to determine if PC count, as determined by CD34+ cell count in peripheral blood, was associated with 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and measures of subclinical atherosclerosis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

CD34+ cell count by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, coronary artery calcification (CAC) by electron beam computed tomography, and CVD risk factors were obtained. Carotid intimal-medial thickness (CIMT) also was obtained in a subset of 57 men. After adjusting for 10-year CVD risk, CD34+ cell count was significantly associated with CAC quantity (p = 0.03) and CIMT (p < 0.0001). A 1-unit increase in natural-log transformed CD34+ cell count was associated with an estimated 55.2% decrease (95% CI: -77.8% to -9.3%) in CAC quantity and an estimated 14.3% decrease (95% CI: -20.1% to -8.1%) in CIMT.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased CD34+ cell count was associated with a decrease in extent of subclinical atherosclerosis in multiple arterial beds, independent of 10-year CVD risk. Further investigations of associations of CD34+ cell count with subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals could provide mechanistic insights into the atherosclerotic process.

KEYWORDS:

atherosclerosis; carotid arteries; coronary artery calcification; epidemiology; risk factors

PMID:
20407620
PMCID:
PMC2856343

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center