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Eur J Hum Genet. 2010 Aug;18(8):909-14. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2010.53. Epub 2010 Apr 21.

Risk of breast and prostate cancer is not associated with increased homozygosity in outbred populations.

Author information

1
Section of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

Regions of restricted genetic heterogeneity due to identity by descent (autozygosity) are known to confer susceptibility to a number of diseases. Regions of germline homozygosity (ROHs) of 1-2 Mb, the result of autozygosity, are detectable at high frequency in outbred populations. Recent studies have reported that ROHs, possibly through exposing recessive disease-causing alleles or alternative mechanisms, are associated with an increased cancer risk. To examine whether homozygosity is associated with breast or prostate cancer risk, we analysed 500K single-nucleotide polymorphism data from two genome-wide association studies conducted by the Cancer Genetics Markers of Susceptibility initiatives (http://cgems.cancer.gov/). Six common ROHs were associated with breast cancer risk and four with prostate cancer (P<0.01). Intriguingly, one of the breast cancer ROHs maps to 6q22.31-6q22.3, a region that has been previously shown to confer breast cancer risk. Although none of the ROHs remained significantly associated with cancer risk after adjustment for multiple testing, a number of ROHs merit further interrogation. However, our findings provide no strong evidence that levels of measured homozygosity, whatever their aetiology (autozygosity, uniparental isodisomy or hemizygosity), confer an increased risk of developing breast or prostate cancer in predominantly outbred populations.

PMID:
20407466
PMCID:
PMC2987391
DOI:
10.1038/ejhg.2010.53
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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