Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Surg. 2010 Apr;145(4):334-8. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.20.

Total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair without mesh fixation: prospective study with 1-year follow-up results.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, 02903, USA. emessaris@brown.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the outcomes of patients undergoing total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair without fixation of the mesh.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort.

SETTING:

Community teaching hospital.

PATIENTS:

A total of 274 consecutive patients were included in the study group.

INTERVENTIONS:

All operations were performed by the same surgeon with the patients under general anesthesia in an outpatient setting. A preformed polyester mesh (Parietex; Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts) was used in all cases without any fixation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

All patients were prospectively followed up at 2 weeks, 1 month, and 1 year after surgery. Operative morbidity, chronic pain, and hernia recurrence were recorded.

RESULTS:

Two hundred seventy-four consecutive patients underwent 311 total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs. No conversions were made to open hernia repairs. No recurrences were found at the 12-month follow-up visit. There were 19 inguinal seromas (6.1%) identified at 2 weeks, but only 7 (1.9%) remained at 1 month, and none at 1 year. No wound infections, scrotal hematomas, or other perioperative complications were reported. Two hundred thirty-six patients used fewer than the 30 prescribed tablets for pain control, while 23 patients requested a refill, 12 of whom had seromas (P < .01). At 12 months, no patient was taking pain relief medication; however, 8 patients reported occasional discomfort in the groin, and 1 patient reported occasional umbilical discomfort.

CONCLUSION:

This single general surgeon experience supports total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair without mesh fixation as a safe, effective procedure with low morbidity and no evidence of recurrence at the 1-year follow-up visit.

PMID:
20404282
DOI:
10.1001/archsurg.2010.20
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center