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Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2010 Aug;56(2):562-71. doi: 10.1016/j.ympev.2010.04.005. Epub 2010 Apr 14.

Phylogeography and molecular adaptation of Siberian salamander Salamandrella keyserlingii based on mitochondrial DNA variation.

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1
Institute of Biological Problems of the North, Magadan 685000, Russia. malyarchuk@ibpn.ru

Abstract

We assessed the phylogeographic pattern of Siberian salamander (Salamandrella keyserlingii, Dybowski, 1870), which appear to be the most northern ectothermic, terrestrial vertebrate in Northern Eurasia, by sequence analysis of a 611-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 159 specimens from different localities (Khabarovsk region, Sakhalin, Yakutia, Magadan region, Chukotka, Kamchatka and others). The data revealed that cytochrome b lineages of S. keyserlingii are divided into haplogroups A, B and C. Haplogroup A and B sequences are widespread in the Far East region, whereas haplogroup C consisting of several phylogenetic clusters (C1, C2, C3) is present in the all range of S. keyserlingii. Among them, cluster C3 appears to be specific for Sakhalin; most likely, it has arisen in situ in this island, with the entry time of the founder mtDNA estimated at about 0.4 MY. Analysis of cytochrome b gene variation by using different neutrality tests (including those based on K(A)/K(S)-ratio) has shown that differences between haplogroups were statistically insignificant, thus suggesting selective neutrality. However, analysis of amino acid changes allowed us to detect a signature of molecular adaptation, which might have led to appearance of adaptive cytochrome b variants in haplogroup C, originating most likely at the end of Eopleistocene (about 0.64 MY based on the haplogroup C divergence level). It seems probable that this adaptive mechanism could promote subsequent populating of new regions.

PMID:
20398779
DOI:
10.1016/j.ympev.2010.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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