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Dig Dis Sci. 2010 Dec;55(12):3415-22. doi: 10.1007/s10620-010-1209-2. Epub 2010 Apr 17.

Patient and physician satisfaction with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): are there opportunities for improvement?

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Health System, 3912 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0362, USA. wchey@umich.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have explored the satisfaction with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

AIM:

The aim of this study was to assess patient and physician satisfaction with currently prescribed PPIs for patients with GERD.

METHODS:

Separate online surveys were completed by 1,002 physicians and 1,013 GERD patients. Physician surveys examined satisfaction, symptom relief, long-term therapy, side-effects, breakthrough symptoms, and use of supplemental medications with PPIs. Patient surveys evaluated PPI regimen, length of therapy, satisfaction with PPI, symptom relief, use of supplemental medications, and perceptions about long-term use and side-effects.

RESULTS:

Most respondents were satisfied with PPI therapy, but 35.4% of GERD patients and 34.8% of physicians perceived patients as "somewhat satisfied" to "completely dissatisfied" with PPI therapy. Patients who were highly satisfied were more likely to indicate complete symptom relief (P < 0.001) relative to patients who were less satisfied. However, over 35% of patients on once-daily and 54% on twice-daily PPI indicated that therapy failed to completely relieve symptoms. Patients who were highly satisfied were more likely to recommend medication to patients with the same symptoms (P < 0.001) and less likely to report that the medication is too expensive (P < 0.001), worry about long-term use (P < 0.001), or add OTC medications for supplemental control (P < 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS:

Approximately one-third of GERD patients reported persistent symptoms and were dissatisfied with PPI therapy.

PMID:
20397047
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-010-1209-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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